Graduation Requirements

Diligent and thoughtful planning will help Helias students maximize their educational experience during their four years as a Crusader. It is suggested that all freshman and sophomores take 7 credits including a credit in Theology. Juniors and seniors may take 6 to 7 credits, including a credit in Theology. Before selecting his/her course, each student should read the course descriptions carefully, noting the required and elective programs that will best prepare him/her for today and tomorrow. Students and families work in conjunction with the administration, counselors, and teachers to plan a rigorous course of study while at Helias Catholic. In compliance with the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Helias requires 26 credits for graduation.

Subject Helias Graduation Requirements Typical College Admission Requirements
Theology 4 credits 1 credit per year No credit required
English 4 credits 1 credit per year 4 credits
Mathematics 3 credits 4 credits Algebra I or higher
Science 3 credits 3 credits, one must be a lab
Social Studies 3 credits Civics .5 credits American History: 1 credit 3 credits
Physical Education 1 credit
Health .5 credit
Foreign Langauge 2 credits in the same language
Fine Arts 1 credit 1 credit
Practical Arts 1 credit
Personal Finance .5 credit
Electives 5.5 credits

Advanced Placement (AP) (10-12)

Advanced Placement courses (AP) is a program in the United States created by the College Board which off ers college-level curricula and examinations to high school students. American colleges and universities may grant placement and course credit to students who obtain high scores on the examinations. AP courses are taught by Helias teachers during the regular school day. Students are not required to take an AP class in order to take an AP Exam, although it is highly recommended. Students may also take an AP course without taking an AP Exam. AP Exams are administered at Helias in May; the cost per exam is paid by the family.

Dual Credit (DC) (10-12)

Dual Credit courses (DC) are college level courses taught by Helias faculty for both college and high school credit. Through approval from local colleges and universities, Helias faculty teach the course in accordance with each college’s approval. In order to earn college credit, students must meet the criteria of the accrediting university which include ACT qualifying score and pay the established fees as set by each institution.

Credit Recovery

If a student fails a class, the credit can be recovered in a number of ways. First, students can re-enroll in the class. Second, students can attend summer school if off ered. Finally, in certain circumstances, students may be allowed to do online coursework to earn credit.

Student Accommodations

Helias is committed to assisting every student to grow academically, spiritually, and socially. We request all concerns regarding a student’s challenges go through the Student Success Center. The Student Success Center team, in partnership with families, will determine the appropriate course of action to assist each child.

A+ Program (9-12)

A+ is a program funded by the State of Missouri which provides scholarship funds to eligible graduates of A+ designated high schools who attend a participating public community college or university. The A+ designation allows students to earn A+ scholarships so that upon graduation they are more easily able to aff ord community college or other post-secondary technical or vocational programs. In order to qualify students must meet the following guidelines:

  • Be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.
  • Enter into a written agreement with your high school prior to graduation.
  • 95 percent attendance (appeals can be made in cases of illness or injury)
  • Students must perform at least 50 hours unpaid mentoring or tutoring (25 percent may include job shadowing)
  • Maintain a record of good citizenship and avoid the unlawful use of drugs and/or alcohol. * Any infraction must be reported to the A+ Coordinator the next school day. Students who have an infraction are ineligible to apply
  • Students must have achieved a score of 17 on the math portion of the ACT.
  • Students must have at least a 2.5 grade point average.
  • Must complete Federal Application for Student Financial Aid (that does not require repayment).
Grading System

Helias Catholic utilizes a quarterly grading system with each quarter consisting of nine weeks. Parents are encouraged to monitor their student’s progress via the parent link on SIS. Grade point average (GPA) is based on a 4.00 point system. All subjects, including Nichols Career Center classes, are equally weighted in determining GPA.

Regular Grading Scale: AP course grading scale:
100 - 93 A 4.0 100 -90 A 4.0
92 - 90 B+ 3.7 89 - 87 B+ 3.7
89 - 87 B 3.4 86 - 94 B 3.4
86 - 85 B- 3.0 83 - 80 B- 3.0
84 - 81 C+ 2.7 79 - 77 C+ 2.7
80 - 87 C 2.4 76 - 74 C 2.4
77 - 75 C- 2.0 73 - 70 C 2.0
74 - 73 D+ 1.7 69 - 67 D+ 1.7
72 - 71 D 1.49 66 - 64 D 1.49
70 D- 1.0 63 - 60 D- 1.0
69 - 0 F 0 59 - 0 F 0

Semester grades are determined by using the raw (unrounded) percentages of the quarters and the semester exam. The quarters count for 40% each and the exam for 20%.

Two honor rolls are recognized: ‘A’ Honor Roll requires a grade point average of at least 3.833; ‘B’ Honor Roll requires a GPA between 3.00 and 3.832 with no grade lower than a C. All subjects, including Nichols Career Center, are considered in determining the honor rolls.

Helias Catholic is a non-ranking school, thus no student receives a class rank. The Valedictorian(s) represent the student(s) earning the highest GPA in the class; while also taking at least four full-year AP courses.

Business

The Business Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Effectively manage personal finances.
  • Apply technology to analyze, synthesize, and evaluate situations at home, school, and work.
  • Know how to use employment resources.
  • Practice skills to become an informed citizen, wise consumer, and a producer of goods and services.
  • Differentiate between ethical and unethical decisions in the workplace, at school, or at home.

Other Information:

  • All students are required to earn 1 credit in a practical art, any business or technology class fulfills this requirement.
  • All students are required to take Personal Finance as a graduation requirement. Consumer Education can replace this requirement.

 

1102 Word Processing

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Word Processing is a beginning level computer course. Improving/learning the alphabetic keyboard as well as speed and accuracy will be emphasized throughout the semester. The curriculum will include formatting business documents such as reports, letters, tables, and memorandums. Utilizing the menu tabs and ribbon features will be emphasized in detail within this course.

1113 Digital Technology

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

The Digital Technology class is designed to prepare students to utilize technology for academic and business purposes. A thorough study of technology ethics and protection ill be emphasized. The course will include digital citizenship and literacy. Students will  complete a variety of projects using different programs displaying their skills as a  wenty- i rst century learner. This course is designed to aid students to be successful in the work world and academic setting.

1114 Web Design Development I

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: College Algebra and signature of Math Instructor

Web Design Development I serves as an introduction to the design, creation, and maintenance of web pages and websites. This course teaches basic coding of web  ages,  including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. The course progresses from introductory  ork  n web design to a culminating project in which students design and develop a  website for a club or team at Helias.

1115 Digital Design I

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Digital Design I is an introduction to basic, entry-level skills of digital and graphic design. Students will be introduced to the following: basic graphic design skills, digital publishing concepts and operations, layout of print and digital publications, decision-making activities, photo manipulation, and digital imaging. Students will develop
the overall layout and production design for advertisements, brochures, and magazines (print and digital). Students will complete these activities with software such as the Adobe Creative Cloud Suite, commonly used in the digital publishing industry. The software emphasized will be Adobe Photoshop, Adobe InDesign, and Adobe Illustrator.

1116 Digital Design II

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Digital Design I

The Digital Design II course is advanced in nature from Digital Design I. Students will learn the advanced skills required for careers that focus on digital and graphic design. Students will learn the advanced features for the Adobe Creative Suite software including Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. Students will be introduced to
the software programs Premiere Pro, After Effects and Dreamweaver. Premiere Pro and After Effects will allow for video editing, and Dreamweaver will focus on web design and web creation.

1110 Computer Publications

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

The Computer Publishing course extensively uses technical skills to utilize the online software, Yearbook Avenue. Units of study include teamwork, responsibility, brainstorming, content, coverage, concept, reporting, writing, editing, photography, typography, design, graphics, finances, yearbook campaigns, advertising and
distribution. Students produce the school’s yearbook.

1109 Integrated Computer Applications

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Word Processing or Digital Technology with Instructor Signature required.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual credit through Lincoln University

Integrated Computer Applications is a college level course for students to learn how to create professional documents in the integrated applications of word processing, database, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and other applications pertinent to business. Upon completion of this course, the student should have an understanding
of which software application is most efficient for the situation and have a thorough understanding of terminology related to the applications.

1104 Consumer Education

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Consumer Education is designed to enable the student to become a wise consumer. Students will have a better understanding of the consumer’s role in the economy. In the course, students will look at the factors that help a consumer make economically sound decisions in the areas of purchasing, budgeting, using credit, borrowing, saving, investing, sharing economic risks, and using natural resources. This course fulfills the Personal Finance graduation requirement.

1103 Introduction to Business

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to business will introduce students to the world of business and help them prepare for the economic roles of consumer, worker, and citizen. The course will explain the importance of the decision-making process and help them prepare for future employment. Topics discussed include the economic system of the United States versus other nations’ systems, business structures (partnerships, corporations, franchises), managerial styles, marketing techniques, and technology advances in business. 1107 Business Law

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Students will explore the foundations of personal and business law. Topics include contracts, criminal law, consumer protection, wills and estates, property law, contracts, ethics, and court systems. In addition students will complete reports, case studies and debate.

1108 Personal Finance

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

This course will enable students to make sound financial decisions in their personal lives. The course is designed to address a variety of learning styles. Learning will occur through lecture, audio CDs, videos, independent reading, and hands-on activities. The course is divided into four units: Income, Money Management, Spending/Credit and Saving/Investing.

1112 AP Economics

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: A or B in Geometry A

This course is designed to prepare students for the AP Economics Exam. The AP course is divided into two distinct parts: microeconomics (scarcity, price determination, the theory of the firm, externalities) in the first semester and macroeconomics (public finance, fiscal and monetary policy, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade) in the second semester. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking skills through the understanding, application, and analysis of fundamental economic concepts. This course requires significant work outside of class and during the summer leading into the course.

1105 Accounting I

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Signature of Accounting Instructor required/Purchase workbook from school bookstore Accounting I is the initial course to help the student develop an understanding of financial transactions with the ability to record, present, and interpret these transactions. Students are introduced to the combination journal, special journal, general ledger, subsidiary ledgers, and accounting for the microcomputer. One practice set is completed which shows the students in a more realistic manner the handling of business vouchers such as checks, invoices, statements, memos, etc . Values of fairness and honesty in business are stressed.

1111 Accounting II

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Accounting I and Signature of Accounting I Instructor required/Purchase workbook from school bookstore Accounting II is the advanced course to help students further develop their understanding of accounting transactions. Corporate accounting, cost accounting, departmentalized, and management accounting is the focus of this year-long course. One practice set is completed which shows the students in a more realistic manner the handling of business forms, statements, checks, and reports. Values of fairness and business ethics are stressed.

English

The English Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in literary history with an understanding of religious, moral, and social values relevant to a developing faith life.
  • Communicate skillfully and effectively through print, visual, auditory, and technological media in the home, school, community and workplace.
  • Implement research strategies using a variety of media, both electronic and print.
  • Utilize critical thinking in the interpretation of literature.
  • Develop various reading strategies to facilitate individual reading level/style.

1220 English I

(Grade 9; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

English I combines the study of literature, grammar, and composition. Students will learn terms and literary techniques used in short stories, poetry, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Greek mythology, and novels. Composition skills will emphasize correct sentence structure and writing a unifi ed, coherent essay. The class will have a library unit to develop competence in research using both print and online materials. The class also focuses on grammar skills, parts of speech, sentence structure, usage, and vocabulary.

1224 English II

(Grade 10; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In English II students will read short stories, poetry, drama, Arthurian legends, and novels. Students will learn to identify, analyze, and interpret plot, setting, characterization, narration, diction, figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and theme. Students will identify and analyze different types of poetry and major characteristics of drama. A point of emphasis will be writing techniques and the demonstration of these skills including essays of analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Instruction will also include increased emphasis on vocabulary and ACT preparation.

1226 Great Books I/Essay

(Grade 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In Great Books I/Essay, students will concentrate on reading Classic modern works of literature. Students will interpret and evaluate novels to determine and support a thesis statement and write a literary essay for novels. Students will also write argumentative and personal essays and work to improve writing skill, style, and essay structure. This course is a prerequisite to enroll in Advanced Placement English.

1227 Great Books II/Research Paper

(Grade 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of Great Books I/Essay

Great Books II/Research Paper is a college-preparatory course which concentrates on the reading of literary classics and learning the necessary skills for constructing a documented research paper. Students will discuss the literary value and techniques of the work and will interpret and evaluate selected novels. Students will apply research skills and will emphasize self-discipline in following directions, meeting specific deadlines, and implementing documentation.

1228 American Literature

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

American Literature is a chronological study of American literature. Authors include Ben Franklin, Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe, Walt Whitman and Robert Frost. Students will be asked to respond to the literature in writing and will work to develop independent reading skills and maturity in analysis.

1229 English Literature

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

English Literature is a chronological study of some of the great works in English literature. Works include Arthurian legend, The Canterbury Tales, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, and modern short stories and poems. Students will be asked to respond in writing to literature and will work to develop independent reading skills and maturity in analysis.

1230 World Classics

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

World Classics consists of a survey of literary works, including authors from ancient Greece to the modern period. Reading selections represent a variety of cultures from around the world. The course is designed to give students additional exposure to the essay, short story, poetry, drama, and the novel. Students will be asked to respond to the literature in writing and will work to develop independent reading skills and maturity in analysis.

1231 Creative Writing

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

This course combines reading with writing as a means of self-expression and self-discovery. Students will create short stories, poems, movie scripts, prayers, and original characters. Studying novels and other writing stimulates imagination and provokes consideration of moral and ethical values requiring the student to search within for expression. Students are encouraged to view language with an artistic eye and cultivate it as a form of creative expression.

1232 Journalism I

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

This course broadens student knowledge of print, social, and broadcast media. The history, ethics, and techniques of journalism will complement the major units of study: reporting, writing, editing, photography, video creation, social media communication, graphic design, management, advertising, and teamwork. In addition, students will learn computer publications tools including Adobe InDesign; broadcast production applications including iMovie and Pinnacle Studio Pro.

1234 Journalism II

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: A C+ or better in Journalism I and Instructor’s Signature.

This advanced course is a follow-up course to Journalism I. A more advanced study of the history, ethics, and techniques of journalism will complement the major units of study: reporting, broadcast reporting, live reporting, live sports reporting, writing, editing, photography, graphic design, management, advertising, and teamwork. In addition, students will develop advanced skills with computer and internet publication tools like Wordpress, Instagram, Twitter, YouTube, and Adobe Photoshop.

1233 AP English

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Great Books I/Essay. Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University.

ACT Score of 18 on English section required.

This course is an intensive study of literature and composition to prepare the advanced senior student. It demands skills in reading; writing and thinking; and requires independent work. It will include an intensive study of various genres of literature to develop close reading skills and a broad frame of reference of ongoing literary themes. Students will be expected to write frequently and practice analysis, exposition, and critical essay skills. Students will learn the proper research methods in order to write a research paper. They will be required to do summer reading and writing before the course.

1210 English IV

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

English IV is designed to provide students with the opportunity to practice effective note taking, improve vocabulary, and review basic skills. The course will address reading comprehension and practical writings used in daily life. Various genres will be used for enhancing comprehension and analysis of contemporary literature.

Fine Arts

The Fine Arts Department focuses instruction so that students will:

  • Exercise creativity in the production of works in the area of design, graphic/ computer design, drawing, painting, music, and design composition and sculpture.
  • Evaluate and critique works in the light of the basic principles and elements of music, art and design.
  • Manifest a proficiency in the use of tools, technology, and materials related to the particular area of study.
  • Relate the characteristics of a work’s particular style to a specific period in this history of music, art, and design.
  • Integrate spiritual, inspirational, personal, family, and cultural values in the works of music, art, and design.

Other Information:

  • The Fine Arts Department includes courses in Art, Music, Speech, and Drama.
  • All students are required to earn 1 credit in the Fine Arts for graduation.

ART

1350 Art I

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Art I is the beginning course for all students who have an interest in the visual arts. Students will create original artworks in realistic, abstract, and nonobjective styles. Inspired by observation and imagination, they will express themselves through the themes of still life, landscape, and portrait. They will learn about drawing, painting, and mixed-media techniques. Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art is related to history and culture.

1351 Art II

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Art I

Students will develop technical skills in the use of drawing and painting media. They will create original, two-dimensional artworks based upon the themes of observation, expressive figure/portrait, architecture, landscape, still life, printmaking techniques, and personal communication of an idea. Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, printmaking, and understand how art is related to history and culture.

1352 Art III

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Art II & Instructor’s Approval

Students will develop advanced technical skills in the use of drawing and painting media. They will create original, two-dimensional artworks based upon the themes of perspective from observation, narrative art/historical documentation, reflection and transparency, figure, batik techniques, and the development of a thematic idea through a series of related works. Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how drawing evolved in the history of art.

1353 Sculpture I

(Grades 11/12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Art I

Students will develop technical skills in the use of various media such as plaster, clay, paper, wire, and found objects. They will create original, three-dimensional artworks using modeling, carving, assemblage, and casting methods. Students will analyze and critique artworks, discuss aesthetic issues, and understand how art isrelated to history and culture.

1356 Independent Art Instruction

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Art III and Instructor’s Approval

Independent Art Instruction program enables highly motivated students to create original artwork that demonstrates technical skills in a wide range of media through a variety of themes. They will complete a concentration that consists of a body of work around a student-selected theme. Students are encouraged to submit a portfolio at the end of the year to their future college.

MUSIC

1383 Introduction to Music

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to Music is a non-performing course which explores the chronological development of music. The course will cover the basic elements of music and their developments, the stylistic musical periods and their infl uential composers with recognition of their music along with the historical, social, and economic conditions that infl uenced the developments of music in these periods.

1380 Symphonic Band

(Grades 9–12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Middle school band or approval from Director of Bands

In Symphonic Band, students will continue to work on skills learned in middle school. Skills addressed will include: intonation, balance, blend, articulation, style, pulse control, rhythmic accuracy, and technical facility. This will be achieved through full ensemble, chamber groups, and possibly solo opportunities.

During fall semester, the band performs as the Marching Crusaders at home football games, community appearances, parades, and marching band contests. After football season, the band transitions to a concert band and presents at least 2 evening concerts per year in addition to the MSHSAA large ensemble contest held each spring. All students have the opportunity (but not a requirement) to perform in solos and chamber ensembles. Students who meet certain criteria are able to earn a varsity letter for their participation. Students interested in colorguard who do not play an instrument should register for the fall semester only of this course. Two fall semesters of colorguard can fulfill a fine art credit requirement.

1381 Chorus

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None/No Audition

Chorus is a full year course for students designed to provide an atmosphere for the enjoyment, appreciation, and performance of all types of choral music. This choir explores choral music from a wide variety of cultures and time periods through study and performance. The core curriculum emphasizes the basics of vocal technique, sight-reading, music theory, and music history. Students in Chorus are expected to participate in one evening concert each quarter and the State Music Festival as a major part of their grade.

1382 Concert Choir

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None/Audition

This year-long, upper-level performance ensemble is offered to students who are accomplished in vocal performance. Students will continue to develop vocal technique and musicianship, as well as develop critical thinking skills through the analysis of musical elements, including form and text, while continuing to study and perform choral music from a wide variety of cultures and time periods. Students are expected to participate in many performances throughout the year, including one evening concert each quarter and the State Music Festival.

1385 Music Theory

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Signature of Music Department instructor

This course is specifically geared to the serious music student and is intended for students with a desire to continue studying music in a college or university setting. Concepts taught will include: music notation, basic tonal harmony, chord and triad construction, melodic and rhythmic progressions, and part-writing rules of the common practice period. Basic aural skills such as interval recognition and an introduction to melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation will also be discussed.

1387 Women’s Choir

(Grades 10-12, 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None/No audition

This is a year-long course offered to female students as continuation in the choral sequence. The core curriculum is a deeper exploration of vocal technique, music theory, and music history through the study of a wide variety of choral music written for women’s voices. Students in Women’s Choir are expected to participate in at least one evening concert each quarter and the State Music Festival as a major part of their grade.

1388 Show Choir

(Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None/Audition

This is a year-long course offered to men and women interested in singing and dancing in a show of popular music styles. This choir also consists of a band made up of students playing keyboard, guitar, and drums. Students learn techniques of singing a variety of styles for stage performance, historical importance of the era of music performed, and a variety of dance styles. The ensemble rehearses one day per week before school and one evening per week. The show choir will participate in many performances throughout the year, including at least three competitions.

0113 Jazz Band

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Approval of the Director, enrolled in Band, and playing audition on instrument.

The class is designed to familiarize the students with the various styles and types of jazz/stage band music. Students will learn and perform the various styles, skills, techniques, and performance concepts required of this music and develop a cultural awareness and appreciation of jazz music. Performances are an outgrowth of the skills learned and are required.

DRAMA

1395 Speech/Drama

(Grades 9-10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

This course stresses the importance of inter-personal communication. During the course, students will learn the proper method of speech preparation and effective delivery, as well as proper outlining, research techniques, and use of the library. A variety of speaking situations will be introduced including demonstration, informative, impromptu, extemporaneous, persuasive, oral interpretation, and reader’s theater. Students will be given the opportunity to develop self-confidence and poise.

1396 Drama II

(Grades 9-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Instructor’s signature required. Drama I or evidence of previous speech/drama experience

This course is designed for those who wish to develop their speaking/performance abilities to a higher level. Drama I or evidence of a background in speech must be provided (e.g., former participant in Bellarmine Speech League). Members of Drama II are required to be active members of the speech team throughout the school year.

OTHER FINE ARTS

1300 Sociology of the Arts

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Instructor’s signature required

This course is designed to help students understand how changes in art, music, literature, media, fashion, science and technology reflect the social, political, and economic trends of each decade from 1920-1980. This is a project-based course. Information for projects is gathered through individual and group research, and through audio and video programs. The course requires both independent and group work. Good time-management skills are necessary. This course could be used to satisfy either a Fine Arts or Social Studies credit requirement.

Foreign Language

The Foreign Language Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Communicate at a level-appropriate ability in the areas of reading, writing, speaking,and understanding spoken language.
  • Gain knowledge and understanding of other cultures to the extent that general patterns of behavior and ways of life are recognized and new insight into how language and culture shape world views.
  • Connect with other disciplines as they develop the ability to acquire information and recognize distinctive viewpoints only available through foreign language and culture.
  • Gain knowledge of and acceptance of diversity within our community and the world.
  • Use level-appropriate language within and beyond the school setting and for personal enjoyment and enrichment, all while enhancing career options.

*For students who do not intend to complete four years of foreign language, it is entirely appropriate to take level 1 of a language either their freshman or sophomore year.

FRENCH

1400 French I

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In French I students learn the basic skills of speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the French language. The course is designed to acquaint the student with the customs and daily life of French-speaking people as well as lead them to an understanding of the French-speaking world.

1401 French II

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Minimum of ‘C’ in French I

French II students learn to further develop the student’s skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing the French language. More emphasis is given to grammar and vocabulary expansion. Students are exposed to more of the culture of the people who speak the language and to their history.

1402 French III

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Minimum of ‘C’ in French II

French III students learn to expand their knowledge and use of the language in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. There is more emphasis on the mechanics of the language as well as literacy so the student becomes more capable in reading and responding to textual materials.

1403 AP French

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French III.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

AP French students continue to develop the grammatical knowledge and application of that knowledge in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing. Special emphasis is given to vocal communication in addition to the practice with textual materials. At the end of this course, the student may elect to take the AP French Language and Culture exam for college placement.

1404 AP French Literature – Independent Study

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and Administration.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

AP French Literature places special emphasis on literature, grammar, and teaching the lower levels of French. This course is an independent study and is specifi c to the individual student.

SPANISH

1405 Spanish I

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Spanish I is designed to help students gain beginning knowledge into the Spanish language and to prepare them for college level material. Basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, along with correct pronunciation are emphasized throughout this yearlong course. Cultural items include art, literature, history, and the current events of the Spanish-speaking world. These topics form a major part of the coursework and help students’ language appreciation grow from the fi rst day of participation. This course provides a foundation of Spanish language study that prepares students for future Spanish language coursework.

1406 Spanish II

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Spanish I

Spanish II is designed to help students gain further knowledge into the basics of Spanish language and to prepare them for college level material. Basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, along with correct pronunciation are emphasized throughout this yearlong course. Cultural items include art, literature, history, and the current events of the Spanish-speaking world. This course provides a foundation for future study of Spanish at the college level.

1407 Spanish III

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in Spanish II

Spanish III is designed to help students gain further knowledge into the Spanish language by studying advanced grammar concepts and literature throughout a yearlong course. This course focuses on developing the four skills of communication in language: listening, reading, writing, and most importantly, speaking. Cultural knowledge of holidays, dances, foods, music, politics, and current events will be expanded upon. This class provides a stronger foundation of the Spanish language study that will prepare students for college-level material.

1408 AP Spanish IV

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C” in Spanish III.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Spanish IV (AP Spanish) expands upon the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The content of the course explores the advanced grammar structures and usage as well as Latin American literature, history, current issues, art, culture and colloquial language (slang) in a Spanish language format. This course is organized through a variety of methods and follows the AP Guidelines as determined by the AP College Board. The intent of the course is to advance the students in every aspect of their target language in order to better prepare them for more advanced college Spanish coursework.

1409 AP Spanish V Literature

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Spanish IV and instructor’s approval.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Spanish V (AP Spanish) is a class designed to off er the advanced Spanish students an opportunity to continue their Spanish studies leading them to a more advanced placement in college-level courses. The primary focus on this course is a completion of the AP College Board’s standards using literature in order to better understand a variety of other topics. Students will explore history of the countries and make literature analysis of the language structure as well as be asked to express themselves verbally and through written constructs. AP Spanish Literature is equivalent to a college-level course.

LATIN

1410 Latin I

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Latin I is an introduction to the language of the ancient Romans and is intended to provide the fundamental skills to begin translation of Latin text. Students will learn Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax in order to translate basic Latin text, while improving their knowledge of English grammar, vocabulary, spelling, and ancient Roman history. Classes will consist of the study of Latin grammar, translation exercises, weekly vocabulary quizzes, and class discussion of periodic assignments. Latin not only contributes greatly to the formation of a student’s faith, but is critical for development in all phases of learning.

1411 Latin II

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Latin I

Latin II completes the introduction to the Latin language, and provides all skills for the translation of Latin text. Students will complete the Latin grammar, vocabulary and syntax in order to translate Latin text, while improving their knowledge of English grammar, vocabulary, spelling and ancient Roman history. Classroom activities will consist of the study of Latin grammar, translation exercises, weekly vocabulary quizzes and discussion of periodic assignments. Latin not only contributes greatly to the formation of a student’s faith, but is critical for development in all phases of learning.

1412 Latin IIl

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Latin Il

Latin IIl students will apply the grammar, vocabulary and syntax learned in Latin I and Latin ll in reading intermediate level texts such as The Vulgate and Caesar’s Gallic Wars. In the course of reading these texts, students will review grammar and syntax from various alternative sources, and will expand their knowledge of vocabulary while reading, and directly via weekly quizzes.

Math

The Math Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Use logical reasoning and problem solving for everyday life situations.
  • Add, subtract, multiply, and divide rational numbers.
  • Use methods of individual and collaborative problem solving and decision making.
  • Use technology resources to research and solve problems.
  • Recognize geometric shapes and understand the properties that apply to the shapes.

Other Information:

  • All students are required to earn 3 credits in Mathematics for graduation.

1500 Pre-Algebra

(Grade 9; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Counselor’s approval and signature

In Pre-Algebra students will review skills in multiplication, division, subtraction, and addition. This course is taught with an intuitive approach to the study of these skills through problems related to everyday life, activities,and graphs. Also included is a basic study of probability and statistics using probability proportion. Students Will work on developing their ability to estimate answers and measurements, as well as work with simple algebraic equations, metric systems, integers, fractions, decimals, equations, and inequalities. Students completing Pre-Algebra will be expected to move to Algebra I B.

1501 Algebra I B

(Grades 9–10; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: 8th grade standardized test scores

This course is an introduction to Algebra. Topics covered are properties of real numbers, solving equations and inequalities, and systems of equations relations. Graphs, polynomials, factors and rational expressions, irrational numbers, radicals, and quadratic equations are also covered. Material is presented with more time for classroom help and review than Algebra I A. Axioms and proofs are not included.

1502 Algebra I A

(Grades 9-10; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: 8th grade standardized test scores

This course is an introduction to Algebra. Topics covered are properties of real numbers, solving equations and inequalities, and systems of equations relations. Graphs, polynomials, factors and rational expressions, irrational numbers, radicals, and quadratic equations are also covered.

1503 Geometry B

(Grades 10-11; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra I-A or Algebra I-B

Geometry B is an introduction to a deductive mathematical system. Students will learn spatial visualization, working with lines and fi gures in a plane, theorems, the relation of parallel and perpendicular lines, fi nding area and volume of three-dimensional fi gures, and similar and congruent triangles. Geometric constructions using straight edge and compass are also covered. Material is presented with more time for classroom help and review than Geometry A.

1504 Geometry A

(Grades 9-11; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Demonstrated advanced profi ciency in Algebra in 8th grade, C average in Algebra I-A or in Algebra I-B with Instructor’s approval

Geometry A is an introduction to a deductive mathematical system. Students will learn spatial visualization, working with lines and fi gures in a plane, theorems and their proofs, the relation of parallel and perpendicular lines, and similar and congruent triangles, fi nding area and volume of three-dimensional fi gures. Geometric constructions by using straight edge and compass are also covered.

1508 Algebra II B

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra I and Geometry

Algebra II B is designed to further student’s’ algebraic knowledge from Algebra I. Algebra II B stresses both the structure of algebra and the development of computational skills. Topics include linear functions and relations, systems of linear equations and inequalities, determinants, polynomials, rational expressions, radicals, irrational numbers, and exponents. Material is presented with more time for classroom help and review than Algebra II A.

1505 Algebra II A

(Grades 10-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: at least a C average in Geometry A, or special permission from Math instructor

Algebra II A is designed to further student’s algebraic knowledge from Algebra I. Students are introduced to the complex number system, exponential functions, logarithms, and trigonometry. Algebra II A both stresses the structure of algebra and the development of computational skills. Topics include linear functions and relations, systems of linear equations and inequalities, determinants, polynomials, rational expressions, radicals, irrational numbers, exponents, trigonometric functions, identities, and formulas.

1515 Math Analysis & Trigonometry

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra II-A or B

In Math Analysis and Trigonometry, students will expand on the topics of Algebra II B and learn about graphing, probability, statistics, exponential functions, logarithms, trigonometry, rational and radical expressions, systems of non-linear, critical thinking and problem solving.

1509 College Algebra

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra II-A or Pre-Calc.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit though Truman State University

College Algebra is a computer-based college level math course for seniors who wish to take their entry level college math course for dual credit. After completion of this course students will be ready to move on to Calculus I. Course content includes a thorough analysis of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions and their graphs. It also includes the study of trigonometric identities and applications, problem solving, matrices, solving equations within the complex number system, and solving systems of equations and inequalities.

1506 Pre-Calculus

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: C average in Algebra II A and with Instructor’s signature

Pre-calculus is an introduction to mathematical analysis with additional study of ordered fi elds and math logic. Students will be introduced to sequences and series--both fi nite and infi nite. This course covers an advanced study of higher degree equations and functions and relations including diff erent methods of equation-solving of upper degree functions. It further studies the exponential and logarithmic and trigonometry.

1512 Accelerated Pre-Calculus

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Math Instructor’s signature.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University.

Math placement test required. Accelerated Pre-Calculus includes the topics taught in Pre-Calculus, as well as topics from Analytic Geometry such as a detailed analysis of lines, vectors, matrices, and conic sections. This course prepares students to take AP Calculus.

1507 AP Calculus AB

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit; available for college credit in the 2nd semester)

Prerequisite: Pre-calculus, and/or Accelerated Pre-Calculus, and instructor’s signature.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University (5 hrs)

Advanced Placement Calculus AB is a college level mathematics course which prepares able seniors to take an Advanced Placement test in May. Most colleges and universities grant advanced placement and credit hours to students who have successfully completed the test. After completion of this course students will be able to move on to Calculus II. The course content includes properties of functions, limits including continuity, the derivative including the mean value theorem and applications, anti-derivatives and their applications, techniques of integration, the defi nite integral, and applications of the integral. This course is intended for students who want a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry.

1516 AP Calculus BC

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit; available for college credit)

Prerequisite: A grade of ‘C’ or higher in Accelerated Pre-calculus and instructor signature.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University (10 hrs)

Advanced Placement Calculus BC is a college level mathematics course which prepares able seniors to take an Advanced Placement test in May. Most colleges and universities grant advanced placement and credit hours to students who have successfully completed the test. The course content includes properties of functions, limits (including continuity), the derivative (including the mean value theorem and applications), anti-derivatives and their applications, techniques of integration, the definite integral, applications of the integral, infinite series including Taylor Series, parametric equations, and polar equations. This course is intended for students who want a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry (rectangular, parametric, and polar coordinates, equations and graphs, lines, and conics).

Physical Education

The Physical Education Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Pursue a healthy lifestyle using a basic knowledge of hygiene, nutrition, fitness, and mental health.
  • Participate regularly in various lifetime sports and physical fitness activities.
  • Show evidence of an appreciation of outdoor activity and of the ability to use the appropriate skill sets.

Other Information:

  • All students are required to earn .5 Health credit for graduation.
  • All students are required to earn 1 Physical Education credit for graduation.

1600 Boys’ Physical Education

(Grades 9-10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Physical education for freshman and sophomore boys is designed to introduce a variety of team sports and individual activities intended to improve each student’s personal physical fitness. Along with the games, there is a heavy emphasis on strength, agility, flexibility, and aerobic training--all designed to help the student improve his overall level of fitness.

1601 Girls’ Physical Education

(Grades 9-10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Physical education for freshman and sophomore girls is designed to introduce a variety of team and individual activities intended to improve each student’s personal physical fi tness. Along with games, there is an emphasis on strength, agility, flexibility and aerobic training – all designed to help the student improve her overall level of fitness.

1602 Health

(Grades 9-10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Health is designed to acquaint each student with a variety of health information to enable them to develop good health habits. Subject matter will include information and class discussions, and will require a research paper at the end of the semester. The goal of this class is to help students identify where they fi t in the continuum of wellness, and how to make responsible, healthy decisions while shaping proper attitudes towards personal health care.

1608 Lifetime Sports and Activities

(Co-ed; Grades 11-12; 1 semester, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Lifetime Sports and Activities is designed to introduce each student to a variety of individual and dual sports as well as activities to improve the student’s skill and cardiovascular conditioning. Along with games, there is a heavy emphasis on sportsmanship, strategy, development, and enjoyment -all designed to help the studentimprove his/her level of fi tness.

1609 Outdoor Education

(Co-ed; Grades 11-12; 1 semester, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Outdoor Education is designed to introduce students to a variety of outdoor activities to create an appreciation and understanding of outdoor activities. By studying and practicing the skills associated with the activities, students will improve their understanding of the correct and safe way to be active in the outdoors.

1611 Strength and Conditioning

(Grades 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In Strength and Conditioning students will participate in a program designed by their specific sports coach to increase their strength, conditioning, agility, and appreciation of skill needed for their sport. The class will provide hands-on experience in cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength, and endurance. There will also be an emphasis on changing the body composition through proper diet. Each student will be required to demonstrate an increase in his/her level of strength and conditioning. Students will be instructed in proper methods and a variety of techniques to develop specific muscle groups.

Practical Arts

The Practical Arts Department focuses instruction so student will:

  • Exercise creativity in the production of works in the area of design, graphic/ computer design.
  • Manifest a proficiency in the use of tools, technology, and materials related to the particular area of study.

Other information

  • The Practical Art Department includes courses in Theatre, Drafting Design, Sports Medicine, Life Skills, and Leadership.
  • All students are required to earn 1 credit in the Practical Arts for graduation.

0099 Leadership

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None. Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Drury University

The Leadership course focuses on the fundamental principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking. Students should gain an understanding of themselves and how they might collaborate and interact with, and lead others. Students should gain experience in making arguments and presenting their positions verbally and in writing. This course will equip students with the tools necessary to see the symbiotic relationship between leadership, personal-ethical reasoning, and critical thinking, thus giving them the tools to effectively lead while in high school and beyond.

1302 Design/Construction I

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Purchase Design and Construction Drafting Kit from school bookstore

Design and Construction I is an introduction to the fi eld of architecture. Information is given by the instructor to help students design and draw a set of working drawings for residential homes.

1303 Design/Construction II

(Grades 10-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Design/Construction I and Instructor’s approval.

Purchase Design and Construction Drafting Kit from school bookstore

The students will continue in the fi eld of architecture, but more emphasis will be placed on design problems. Besides residential designs, other areas studied will be commercial designs as well as professional building designs and materials.

1305 Design/Construction III

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Design and Construction I and II/Instructor’s approval.

Purchase Design and Construction Drafting Kit from school bookstore

The student will continue to study the fi eld of residential architecture with emphasis on size problems and creativity. The students will also be researching the cost of building materials, cabinets, doors, windows, appliances, fixtures, and more.

1301 Theater Design/Construction

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Signature of the Design I Instructor

Theatre Design/Construction explores both the design and the construction aspects of theater sets. Students help with the actual design and construction of the sets for any theater productions that take place during the semester this course is taught.

1304 Mechanical Drawing

(Grade 11 -12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Instructor’s approval.

Purchase Mechanical Drawing Drafting Kit from school bookstore

Mechanical Drawing is a good fundamental study of multi-view drawing, isometric projection, auxiliary views, and section drawings. It will enable the student to develop good drafting techniques along with the basic knowledge needed for one who plans to go into drafting or engineering.

1306 Life Skills for the 21st Century

(Grade 11-12; 1 semester, .5 credit)

Prerequisite: none

Life Skills for the 21st Century is the study and management of real-life skills for young adults. Topics include handling fi nances, character building, communication skills, time management, cooking/nutrition, house and car ownership and maintenance, and community involvement. This course will help prepare students for independent living, college, and the work world.

1606 Sports Medicine

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Biology

Sports Medicine examines the many aspects related to athletics, injuries, prevention, and medicine. It begins by exploring the history of sports medicine and the role of the athletic trainer. The course will examine the many kinds of athletic injuries and methods used to prevent injuries. Students will understand the anatomy and mechanism of injury for the most common areas in athletics, including the critically injured. Students will also learn taping and rehabilitation techniques for various athletic injuries. The class will utilize interactive discussions, lecture, and practical labs to master these sports medicine skills.

Science

The Science Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Apply the scientific method to pose questions and generate solutions.
  • Speak accurately about key concepts of the life and physical sciences.
  • Relate scientific knowledge to societal, ecological, and political issues and how they relate to Catholic teaching.
  • Collect and interpret scientific information.
  • Use graphs and tables to answer questions and generate solutions.
  • Use technology properly, such as the internet, to research scientific information and collect scientific data.

Other Information:

  • All students are required to earn 3 credits in Science for graduation.
  • The college bound student should take 4 credits in Science with at least 1 credit in a lab class.


*Earth Science will be offered in 2019/20

1703 Physical Science

(Grade 9; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: None
Physical science will cover the basics of physics and chemistry, including topics such as forces and motion, electricity, matter and energy, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and metric system conversions. The class is centered around hands-on learning and discussions. Throughout the course, the impact of science and technology on daily living is stressed. Laboratory work is included.

1701 Basic Biology

(Grade 10; 2 Semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science

Basic Biology is designed to provide the student with a study of living things on a more practical level. Topics included are use of the microscope, scientifi c method, study of the cell, nutrition, animal groups, genetics, natural selection, plants, ecology, and systems of the human body. There is a variety of laboratory work included for each topic.

1702 Biology

(Grade 9-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science.

Freshmen enrolling in Biology must obtain approval from the principal.

Biology is designed to provide the student with a detailed study of the scientifi c method, the cell, use of the microscope, systems of the body, animal phyla, internal structures of plants, heredity and genetics, natural selection, and ecology. There is a variety of laboratory work included for each topic. Biology is geared for the average to above-average student.

1704 Chemistry

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: C or above in Algebra I-A.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University

This course is a basic study of the fundamentals of inorganic and organic chemistry. For the student who will go on to college, this will be a strong foundation for further study of chemistry. The student who will take no more chemistry will receive a basic understanding of the world around him. The course is structured with lecture and laboratory work. Chemistry is off ered as a dual credit course through Lincoln University. Students may enroll in dual credit chemistry after successful completion of the fi rst semester of chemistry. Please note Chemistry I and II are the equivalent of the college general chemistry series which are typically Prerequisite for organic chemistry. Chemistry I and II are both currently off ered as dual cedit courses through Lincoln University. Each course is 4 credit hours.

1710 AP Chemistry

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science, Biology (recommended, not required) and Algebra II and Instructor signature.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University

AP Chemistry covers the topics of Chemistry I more rapidly and in more depth. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, equilibria, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and thermodynamics. This course is intended for students majoring in a science and needing more than one semester of introductory chemistry. Please note Chemistry I and AP Chemistry are the equivalent of the college general chemistry series which are typically prerequisite for organic chemistry. Chemistry I and AP Chemistry are both currently off ered as dual credit courses through Lincoln University. Each course is 4 credit hours.

1707 Earth Science

(Grade 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology

Earth Science is a laboratory course of study emphasizing Earth processes such as plate tectonics, volcanoes, earthquakes, weathering and erosion, glaciers, weather and Space. Units focus on Earth’s physical features, how those features were created, their function, and how those features aff ect humans and the environment. Lab activities include rock and mineral identifi cation and astronomy. Assignments will include independent writing, project based assignments, and quizzes.

1711 Zoology

(Grade 11-12, 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology

Zoology is a one semester course designed as a survey of the nine major phyla of the Kingdom Animalia. Course content focuses on morphology, taxonomy, anatomy and physiology of respective animals. The course includes laboratory observation and dissection of selected specimens.

1712 Environmental Science

(Grade 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Physical Science and Biology

Are you a responsible steward of the Earth? Environmental Science is a laboratory science course that enables students to develop an understanding of the interrelationships within the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and man-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. Students will explore environmental science concepts through an inquiry-based approach. Concepts explored in this course include: water and land resources, energy resources and consumption, pollution and waste issues, human population, earth systems, global change, and civic responsibility.

1713 Anatomy and Physiology

(Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and Physical Science

Anatomy and Physiology provides a more complete understanding of the basic principles of the human body and its functions. Students interested in professions such as nursing, physical therapy, physical education, pharmacy, and public health are introduced to concepts which will prepare them for further study in their chosen career. This course is an in-depth study of anatomy and physiology with emphasis on microbiology, structure and physiology, cellular structure and function, human anatomy and physiology, and current issues in medicine. The course will include lectures and laboratory work.

1709 Physics

(Grades 11-12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Algebra II, College Algebra, or a strong recommendation from the Geometry Instructor.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual enrollment through Lincoln University

Physics provides a basic study of the fundamentals of physics, presented over two semesters. It is designed to be an investigational course, combining theory and practical application through lectures, laboratories, and interactive demonstrations. Topics include mechanics, states of matter, waves and lights, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. This course is designed to be less mathematically rigorous than AP Physics and would be especially useful for those with an interest in engineering, health and science related fi elds. Students will have the opportunity to take this course dual-enrollment through Lincoln University and earn 4 credit hours of dual credit for each semester.

1705 AP Physics

(Grade 12; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or strong recommendation from Algebra II-A Instructor.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Enrollment through Lincoln University

This course provides an intensive, mathematically based study of the laws and principles that govern the universe. This course covers two-semesters of college-level physics and is designed to prepare students interested in the fi elds of physics, engineering, and medicine. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and critical thinking. Topics include: mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, light and optics, and modern physics. This course places strong emphasis on both lecture and laboratory components. Students who take this class
will be well-prepared to take the AP Physics 1 test. Students who wish to take the AP Physics 2 or the AP Physics C (Calculus based physics) will require some independent study. Students will have the opportunity to take this course dual-enrollment through Lincoln University and earn college credit. Students will earn 4 hours of dual credit for each semester.

1708 AP Biology

(Grade 11-12, 2 semesters, 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology and Chemistry I with a “B” average.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Students must have an in-depth understanding of Biology and Chemistry. AP Biology requires advanced inquiry and reasoning skills, scientifi c inquiry, and connecting concepts across four big ideas. This course is designed to be the equivalent of a college-level introductory biology course. An emphasis is placed on biochemistry, genetics, plant and animal science, cell structure and function, evolution, and ecology. The course is structured with lectures and laboratory work. Students are able to take the AP Biology exam at the end of the school year. Students may earn 4 dual credit hours at the end of the second semester.

Social Studies

The Social Studies Department focuses instruction so that students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to use geographical skills across the Social Studies curriculum.
  • Critically analyze and explain contemporary political, social, and economic issues within the
  • U.S. and abroad. Apply Catholic teachings and ethical analysis to current world events.
  • Integrate the history and politics of Missouri into the Social Studies curriculum.
  • Give examples of how the societal, cultural, and religious environment in which an individual
  • lives helps to explain behavior and world view.

Other Information:

  • All students are required to earn 3 credits in Social Studies for graduation.
  • Students must take Civics for .5 credit and an American History course for 1 credit to meet graduation requirements.

1800 Civics

(Grades 9; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In Civics students learn a basic understanding of how American government on the federal, state, and local level is organized, how the institutions function, and the role of government offi cials. This course provides students with the education necessary to become informed participants in the civic aff airs of their community. It includes a study of “Faithful Citizenship,” the teaching of the U.S. Catholic Bishops on responsible citizenship as a virtue and participation in political life as a moral obligation.

1801 Geography

(Grades 9; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In Geography students focus on the study of the Earth as well as the people who inhabit it. This course will help students review and develop map, globe, and interpretive skills used in the study of geography. Students will also become familiar with the fi ve basic themes in geography: location, place, relationships within places, movement across the Earth’s surface, and regions. These themes will be applied to a study of the United States and selected regions of the world.

1803 World History

(Grades 10; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Civics

In World History students learn to understand and appreciate the roots, development, and nature of American-Western civilization, as well as other civilizations and cultural tradition of the world- namely those of Asia and Africa. This course will help students come to a better understanding of the world around them and enable them to comprehend contemporary problems within a global or international frame of reference.

1804 American History

(Grades 11; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Civics

In American History, students will trace the general development of the U.S. from the Age of Exploration to the 20th century. Areas emphasized will be Age of Exploration, Revolutionary Period, Civil War, development of the West, World Wars I and II, the Twenties and Depression, and post World War II America. Students will gain a broad appreciation for the diverse history of the United States in a global setting.

1808 The United States at War: The Last 100 Years

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Civics and American History

In the United States at War, students will study wars the U.S. has participated in over the last 100 years. Students will analyze the circumstances that lead nations into war and the eff ects these wars have on a global and local scale. It will include a study of the Catholic Church’s teachings on these wars and its presence within war-torn areas.

1809 Psychology I

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Psychology is the scientifi c study of behavior and mental processes. In this course, students explore the areas of memory, learning, motivation, biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, altered states of consciousness, and child development. Emphasis is placed on the scientifi c nature of psychology as well as its personal applications. In order to understand the full range of psychological study, it is strongly suggested that Psychology I be followed by Psychology II.

1810 Psychology II

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Psychology I or the consent of the Instructor

In Psychology II, students continue their study of behavior and mental processes through the areas of adolescent and adult development, personality theories, psychological testing, social psychology, adjustment and breakdown, and human relations. Emphasis is again placed on the scientifi c nature of psychology, as well as its personal applications.

1811 AP American History

(Grade 11; 2 semesters; 1 credit)

Prerequisite: Sophomore English Instructor’s signature or Counselor recommendation.

Must also have a 3.0 GPA or a GPA of at least 2.5 and parental consent to be considered.

Students are required to bring their own laptop.

Dual Credit through Lincoln University

AP American History is designed to provide advanced students with the skills and knowledge necessary to explore the issues and problems of American history. Upon completion of this course, students will be given the opportunity to take an exam for college credit and/or placement. Because the course is taught at a level equivalent to a freshman college survey course, strong reading and writing skills, as well as a high level of self-discipline and motivation, are essential. The course will follow a chronological study of American history from the early colonial period to the present. Emphasis will be on exposing students to a wide variety of historical material and interpretations in order to provide students with the following skills: to think critically and to write clearly; to read, analyze, and use primary and secondary sources; to form and test thoughtful hypotheses.

1812 AP American Government and Politics

(Grades 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Civics. Must also have a 3.0 GPA or higher to be considered.

Students are required to bring their own laptop. Dual Credit through Lincoln University AP American Government and Politics is designed to analyze the social, economic, political, and historical trends in the politics and governmental operations of the United States. Students will be better prepared to critically assess the current developments in the United States and the State of Missouri.

1813 Contemporary World Issues

(Grades 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Contemporary World Issues is an elective designed to focus on learning about and discussing world events and activities of the later 20th century and today. Using group discussion based on research done outside of class, reading of source materials, and completion of related assignments, the class will seek balanced historical explanations surrounding issues “In the News” or of interest to the class. The course goal is to provide a greater global awareness for today and the future.

1300 Sociology of the Arts

(Grades 11-12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: Instructor’s signature required.

Sociology of the Arts is designed to help students understand how changes in art, music, literature, media, fashion, science and technology reflect the social, political, and economic trends of each decade from 1920- 1980. This is a project-based course. Information for projects is gathered through individual and group research, and through audio and video programs. The course requires both independent and group work. Good time-management skills are necessary. This course could be used to satisfy either a Fine Arts or Social Studies credit requirement.

Theology

The Theology Department focuses instruction so students will:

  • Grow in their relationship with Jesus Christ so that they may come to know Him and live according to the truth He has given us.
  • Appreciate that the Church is the living Body of Christ today and that, in and through the Church, they encounter Jesus Christ.
  • Learn many forms of prayer as a means of growing in a deeper relationship with Jesus Christ.
  • Learn how they can encounter Christ in a full and real way through the Sacraments, especially the Eucharist.
  • Read, interpret, and apply Scripture to life.
  • Use Scripture and the Catechism of the Catholic Church to defend and explain the teachings of the Catholic Church.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of the Apostolic Tradition of the Catholic Church throughout history.
  • Understand and value the moral teachings of the Catholic Church to direct them in living a Christ-centered life.
  • Explain how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present in the Catholic Church’s social teaching and mission. Integrate the call of service, especially the preferential option for the poor, into their daily lives as an expression of closeness to Christ and neighbor. . Explore vocational callings and consider the value of considering a vocation in service to the Christian community.

1000 Introduction to the Scriptures (First Semester)

(Grade 9; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Introduction to the Scriptures gives students a general knowledge and appreciation of the Sacred Scriptures. Through their study of the Bible, students will encounter the living Word of God, Jesus Christ. Students will learn about the Bible, authored by God through inspiration, and its value to people throughout the world. They will learn how to read the Bible and become familiar with the major sections of the Bible, including the books in each section. The course will pay particular attention to the Gospels, so students may grow to know and love Jesus Christ more personally.

1001 Who is Jesus Christ? (Second Semester)

(Grade 9; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In “Who is Jesus Christ?” students are introduced to the mystery of Jesus Christ, the living Word of God, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. In this course, students will understand that Jesus Christ is the ultimate Revelation to us from God. In learning about who He is, the students will also learn who He calls them to be as children of God.

1004 The Paschal Mystery (First Semester)

(Grade 10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

The Paschal Mystery course is designed to help students understand all that God has done for us through His Son, Jesus Christ. Through this course of study, students will learn that for all eternity, God has planned for us to share eternal happiness with Him, which is accomplished through the redemption Christ won for us. Students will learn they share in this redemption only in and through Jesus Christ. Students will also be introduced to what it means to be a disciple of Christ and how to live a life of discipleship.

1010 The Church (Second Semester)

(Grade 10; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

The Church course is designed to teach students that in and through the Church they encounter the living Jesus Christ. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him through the Holy Spirit. Students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today, which has both divine and human elements. Students will learn not so much about events in the life of the Church, but about the sacred nature of the Church.

1002 The Sacraments (First Semester)

(Grade 11; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In The Sacraments, students will learn that they can encounter Christ today in a full and real way in and through the Sacraments, especially through the Eucharist. Students will examine each of the Sacraments in detail so as to learn how they may encounter Christ throughout life.

1005 Morality (Second Semester)

(Grade 11; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

In Morality, students will learn God gave humanity the Moral Law implicitly through the Natural Law as reflected in the Golden Rule expressed in numerous world religions and philosophies. In addition, students will gain an understanding that God gave an explicit expression of the Moral Law in the Ten Commandments and the Eight Beatitudes. Through study, students will discover it is only through Christ that they can fully live out God’s plan for their lives. Students will learn the moral concepts and precepts that govern those who wish to live as disciples of Christ. They include: application of the Ten Commandments, Eight Beatitudes, and the Greatest Commandment to their lives; following the example set by Jesus Christ and the saints, understanding how to increase Theological and Cardinal Virtues within their lives, and putting the Works of Mercy into action through service to their neighbor to demonstrate love of God.

1003 Church History (First Semester)

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Church History supplements and expands on what students learned in the sophomore course, The Church. They will be introduced to the fact that the Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and is sustained by Him throughout history through the Holy Spirit. The students will come to know that the Church is the living Body of Christ today, and as such, both divine and human elements. In this course, students will learn about the Church’s 2000 years of history and about how the Church is led and governed by the successors of the Apostles.

1006 Scripture (Second Semester)

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Scripture is an overview of Sacred Scripture with an introduction to the basic principles for understanding and interpreting the Bible. Because of the extent of the scriptural material, this outline will not try to cover the vast content but rather comments about Scripture’s purpose and religious significance. Given the limits of a semester of study, it will not be possible to introduce all of the books of the Bible here. Every effort is made to show a sense of unity of the narrative for the divine plan of salvation, the presence of God’s action in this record of His Revelation, and His desire to share His merciful love with us.

1008 Catholic Social Teaching/Service (Summer)

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Catholic Social Teaching/Service introduces students to the Church’s social teaching. Students learn how Christ’s concern for others, especially the poor and needy, is present today in the Church’s social teaching and mission. Students will also serve as volunteers at school-approved agencies as part of this course.

1011 Ecumenism (Second Semester)

(Grade 12; 1 semester; .5 credit)

Prerequisite: None

Ecumenism helps students understand the manner in which the Catholic Church relates to non-Catholic Christians as well as to other religions of the world. Building on the foundational truth that Jesus Christ established the Catholic Church and entrusted to her the fullness of God’s revelation, the course is intended to help students recognize the ways in which important spiritual truths can also be found in non-Catholic Christian churches and ecclesial communities as well as in non-Christian religions. It is also intended to help them recognize the ways in which other systems of belief and practice differ from the Catholic faith.

Nichols Career Center

(Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; 2-3 periods each day for 2 semesters)

The courses at Nichols Career Center are primarily meant for students who have a career goal directed toward employment or continuing education in a specifi c career and technical fi eld. Students must be in good standing with credits and attendance prior to admittance into a Nichols program. Program slots are limited.

Programs off ered: Auto Collision Technology, Automotive Technology, Building Trades I and II, Computer Technology, Culinary Arts, Electronics/Robotics, Graphic Communications, Health Sciences, Heating/Air Conditioning/Refrigeration, Welding, Agriculture Education (available grades 9-12 with approval), Broadcast Journalism, Intro. to Agriculture and Foundations of Plants & Animals. Please ask your Academic Advisor for more information on Nichols Courses.

ONLINE COURSES

Online courses are available through E2020, an online course provider. Semester courses are available in Science, Mathematics, Language Arts, Social Studies and electives. Students may complete these courses during the school day and/or at home. Courses are available for recovery credit and for enrichment. Students may ordinarily earn a maximum of two credits through E2020. The cost is $100 for a semester course. Please see your Academic Advisor for more information.